A Country Style Christmas Wreath

wreath making for Christmas

At this time of year, it’s good to take time out from the frantic Christmas rush and clear your head. My favourites are to get out into the fresh air and to do something creative, so what better than taking a pair of secateurs and snipping some greenery to make a Christmas wreath. While I greatly admire the glory and perfection of a florist’s wreath, I’m more than happy with a simple, country style wreath using foraged plants. I don’t mind if it’s a little wonky and isn’t made with the season’s must have flowers, as it’s as much about the gathering and making as it is about the finished wreath.

 

How to make a rustic Christmas wreath

 

If you’d like to make a country style foraged Christmas wreath, here’s what to do.

 

making Christmas wreath with fresh foliage

BASE

Cut a few willow whippy branches of willow and twist and twine them together to make a circle. Tie them with string if you think your circle might spring apart. Alternatively, buy a wire ring which has the advantage of being round and won’t fall to pieces.

GREENERY

The trimmings from your Christmas tree are excellent foliage for your wreath. I presume you trim and shape your Christmas tree? Snip a little off the back to make it fit close to the wall? Prune back any wayward branches? Haven’t you read our tips for decorating your Christmas tree? Some people worry about cutting anything off their tree, but I always do, just to give it a good shape. Also, the offcuts are very useful.

As well as your Christmas tree trimmings, cut some holly, ivy, bay leaves, rosemary, thyme or anything green about 20 – 30 centimetres long. The larger your base, the longer your stems will need to be.

Binding foliage for country style Christmas wreath

Using florists wire, bind the greenery to your base. Place a few stems on the base, wind the wire around to hold them firm and then lay the next stems on top to hide the wire and continue to wind the wire round the stems and base, working your way around the circle. When you get back to the beginning, gently lift the heads of the first stems, bind the final stems and then drop the first heads back down to cover the wire. Cut and secure the end of the wire.

DECORATIVES

Collect some pretty seed heads, berries (fake or real), fruit, feathers, baubles or anything else that takes your fancy and poke and weave them into the wreath by slipping them under the wire. If you can’t do this, wire them in separately or stick them on with a hot glue gun. This is the chance to cover any bits of wire that may be showing.

FINISHING OFF

Choose how you want to hang your wreath. Are you decorating it with a ribbon? Will the ribbon hang at the top or the bottom? Decisions, decisions. Either wind the ribbon around and tie a bow or make a ribbon bow and attach it to the wreath with wire or glue. If your ribbon is at the bottom, make a hanging loop at the top with a piece of twine or ribbon.

Find a door, hang your wreath …

Christmas wreath from the hedgerow

… stand back and admire.

Simple triangle shaped Christmas wreath

Of course, you don’t have to make a circular wreath. Tie some sticks together in a triangle shape and decorate as little or as much as you like.

twiggy heart shaped wreath

Make a heart shaped wreath.

Giant Christmas wreath hanging from ceiling

Make a giant wreath and hang it from the ceiling. Using the same technique, but on a larger scale, this wreath is a metre across and dangles from above.

If you don’t have the time or the greenery, buy a plain fir wreath and personalise it with your own decorations.

Whichever you choose, have fun.

26 thoughts on “A Country Style Christmas Wreath

  1. I love the little details and GF feathers in your wreaths Anne. I have been experimenting with teeny tiny wreaths made of fresh herbs such as thyme for a little project I am working on. It is relaxing and calming isn’t it? I love your sturdy doors too x

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    1. Your tiny wreaths sound intriguing. I usually make a small herb wreath for the kitchen at Christmas time so that I don’t have to go out in the cold to pick herbs. That’s not a problem for you though!

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  2. Thank you for the inspiration in this blog, Anne. I have been sorely tempted by glossy pre-made wreathes in catalogues and Christmas shops this year, but am now reminded that I can make my own again. Mine is never as fine as that lovely round wreath you’ve put together ( I do love the feather additions), but it’s the putting together of the wreath that is part of the Christmas ritual. You’re so right – to get out into the countryside and escape the Christmas noise and madness is just wonderful. Especially if it’s a crispy cold sunny day like we’re getting right now ….

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  3. Oh lovely! A green one wouldn’t last a day in our current crispy heat in South Australia but that makes me think about making one with some dried ‘Silver Princess’ gum branches I have. I just want to make all the things!

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