These Autumn Days

These Autumn Days

winter wheat crop emerging in field Essex UK

The brown fields of early October are slowly changing colour. Walk the fields with a farmer and you’ll watch them search the field for the first signs of germination, scrabbling around with their hands to see if there’s still a seed there and if it’s starting to shoot.  Soon there’s a slight green tinge to the field as the first green shoots appear and then the rows of tiny wheat plants become clear as you look across the field. This is next year’s harvest.

sloes growing on blackthorn bush
We’re sloe picking. It’s been a fantastic year for plums of every description and the sloes, forerunners of our modern plums, are no exception. The sloes are picked from the blackthorn hedges on the farm and used for making sloe gin, which seems appropriate as the first record of our farm appears in the Domesday Book, where it’s listed as Slamondesheia, which is thought to originate from the Old English meaning enclosure of the sloe tree hill. We still have plenty of sloe bearing blackthorn on the farm and every new hedge that’s planted here includes a good proportion of blackthorn to keep Slamseys Gin well supplied.

sloes on blackthorn hedge showing sharp thorns
Look at the thorns that we reach across to pick the sloes. They’re vicious and always seem to be right in front of the juiciest looking sloes. Sometimes we prune the blackthorn and pick the sloes from the cuttings. It’s certainly easier for Beth to take a pile of blackthorn branches back to the garden and pick off the sloes while one of her boys sleeps in the pram beside her and the other plays in the sandpit. The two year old is adept at raspberry picking but I think it will be a few years before he can pick sloes.

Rustic measuring stick leaning on Christmas tree

A high tech measuring stick in the Christmas trees. Orders for large trees are coming in from local churches, businesses and parish councils so the trees are chosen, measured and marked ready for cutting down next month. We sold our first Christmas tree of the year in the middle of September and will cut down several this month; all for photo shoots rather than super-excited house decorating. Well, that’s what they told us.

Notley Yoga at Slamseys
The sign outside the Yoga Studio in the yard. In the build up to December, it might be an idea if we all took heed of the advice and stepped inside the door. Instead, we hurry past averting our eyes from the bodies within.

circle using sloes, hips, haws, ivy flowers and leaves
There’s also been a little faffing around with berries and leaves. A calming and meditative pastime. Or a useless waste of time. Depending on your point of view.

 

 

Collect, Inspire, Create

Collect, Inspire, Create

Collect, inspire and create in October or should I change the title?

Autumn arrangement of squashes, apples, quince in The Barley Barn at Slamseys

 

We’ve been collecting autumnal things to decorate The Barley Barn and Ruth has been running autumn themed printmaking workshops for which her students bring in things that remind them of autumn to inspire their printmaking. One person got out her great granny’s cookery notes and made some autumnal gingerbread while others have brought in collections of fruits and vegetables, fabrics, ornaments, colour swatches and wonderful sketches. All of these different collections have been used as inspiration for some interesting printmaking and perfectly fulfil the criteria: collect, inspire, create. Continue reading “Collect, Inspire, Create”

Hip, Hip, Hoorah

Hip, Hip, Hoorah

The rosehips in the hedgerows and garden are ready to pick.

autumn rosehips on Generous Gardener rose

There are deep red round rosehips on the Rosa Rugosa and large round, orange rosehips on The Generous Gardener bush in the garden.

rosehips growing in farm hedgerow

Brightly coloured oval rosehips grow in various hedges around the farm.

It seems a shame not to use them somehow. Here’s a few ideas to use these pretty autumnal fruits.

AUTUMNAL DECORATIONS

string of rosehips hanging from door handle

Thread a needle with cotton and push it through each rosehip. Use a tiny piece of twig at the bottom to stop the hips falling off and use it as a hanging decoration or make a mini garland to string across a small window.

 

AUTUMN WREATH

autumn wreath with rosehips and crab apples

Twist a few branches of willow into a circle and add rosehips, crab apples and acorns to make an autumn wreath. Use a ready made wreath if you don’t have any suitable whippy branches.

AUTUMN PUDDING of ROSEHIP FOOL

If you look up recipes for using rosehips, they mostly instruct you to boil them up and strain them through a jelly bag to extract their juice to make syrups, jellies and soups (being acidic, you can use them instead of tomatoes). Alternatively, you can slit open every rosehip, extract the seeds and hairs and use the flesh for making teas, jams or tarts.

However, the easiest way to use rosehips is to make rosehip puree. Give the freshly picked rosehips a good wash and then simmer them in an equal quantity of water for an hour until they’re soft and squidgy. Allow them to cool a little and then put them through a food mill to puree the flesh and sieve out the seeds in one go. Pushing the puree through a fine sieve afterwards makes sure that all the seeds and hairs are removed. If you don’t have a food mill, just sieve them. You can use the rosehip puree to make soup or use them as you would any other fruit puree. I find that 500g of rosehips simmered with 500g of water gives me about 400g of puree.

The best pairing for the rosehip puree is a little sugar and cream so the ideal simple and delicious thing to make is an autumnal Rosehip Fool. Vary the quantities according to numbers; the recipe below will make six generous helpings.

Rosehip Fool

glasses of rosehip fool surrounded by autumnal acorns and berries

240g rosehip puree (see the method above)
3 tablespoons caster sugar
300ml double cream

Whip the cream until it’s soft and floppy. Add the sugar and puree and briefly whip to ensure it’s evenly incorporated. Spoon into six serving dishes.

You can eat this straight away or leave it to settle for a couple of hours in the fridge.

 

autumn wreath of willow with crab apples and rosehips Autumn dessert Rosehip Fool recipe
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Michaelmas Day predictions

Michaelmas Day predictions

Today is Michaelmas Day, which was once an important quarter day in the farming calendar.

farm sale particulars 1895

Here in the east of England where arable farms predominate, Michaelmas was the time when farms changed hands and tenancies began or ended. Harvest was finished and the ground was being prepared for planting the new year’s crops so it was a natural time for changeovers and stock taking valuations. Nowadays, harvest is usually finished well before Michaelmas Day and some of next year’s crops are already planted in the ground but traditions are hard to break, so we still pay our farm rents on Michaelmas Day and Lady Day (25th March) and many farm businesses still finish their accounting year at the end of September. Continue reading “Michaelmas Day predictions”